Delaney Bates

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Edith, the Tarantula


Photo credit: Tracey Funk

On a night hike at the University of Georgia field station, I encountered a hairy friend, Edith. Edith is a Costa Rican Orange-Kneed Tarantula (Brachypelma smithi) that has inhabited a miniature triangular cave for the past year. Female tarantulas live up to 20 years, and occupy a cave or burrow where they wait to ambush unsuspecting prey.

Bradley Hiatt, our night hike guide and a resident naturalist, explained that Edith had been sitting on her egg sac for 6 months. Only one baby tarantula could be found beneath Edith’s wooly legs, the rest left the burrow after their first molt. The male tarantulas pursue females, so they have a lower survival rate than the females who wait in their burrows.

Costa Rican Orange-Kneed Tarantulas are omnivorous and will eat anything, from insects to small rodents. Irritating hairs on the tarantula’s body are used for protection and to catch prey. When attacked, a tarantula will flick the hairs off into a cloud of dust and hairs so it can quickly escape. Edith has been attacked and used these flicking hairs; the evidence is the bald spot on her abdomen. If the tarantula is backed into a corner, it will perform a threat display before biting its attacker with its malicious fangs. This tarantula species’ bite is not lethal to humans but you may have a nasty wound or allergic reaction.

Edith is one of many extraordinary creatures I observed in Costa Rica. Seeing Edith in her natural habitat positively impacted my perception of peculiar or misinterpreted organisms. 

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Introducing Delaney Bates

Hello! I am Delaney Bates, and I am an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major (junior) at the University of Kansas. I plan to pursue a career in medicine. Traveling the world has always been a dream of mine, and being in Costa Rica is surreal. I first studied abroad in France and Spain when I was 15 years old; I have been craving to travel abroad again. This Costa Rica program allows me to explore biological research, expand my knowledge of organisms in their natural environment, and develop field research skills while immersing myself in an unfamiliar culture and country. Studying abroad at the University of Kansas has been an ambition of mine, and I’m ecstatic to fulfill this goal in Costa Rica.