October 7, 2010

A New Species - Myrmedonota heliantha

Taro Eldredge, a graduate student studying entomology at the Biodiversity Institute, was on a routine collecting trip within view of the University of Kansas campus when he came across an insect he’d never seen before. The insect turned out to be a new species.  The article was published in ZooKeys.

Named in honor of the Sunflower State (helio ~ sun, anothos ~ flower), Myrmedonota heliantha is a 2 millimeter long carnivore that inhabits the Baker Wetlands, a small preserve at the southern edge of Lawrence.  The wetlands are the subject of an ongoing debate about the future of expansion of the nearby Kansas Highway 10.

Myrmedonota heliantha

 

 

The wetlands are also the only place where the insect is currently known to exist.  The discovery of Myrmedonota heliantha shows just how much there is to know about the plant and animal diversity of places close to home.  We still find new species in our own back yards.

Myrmedonota heliantha's insect relatives can detect ant or termite colonies using smell.  They then set up shop in their host's burrows and eat their hosts.  Eldredge is curious if this species lives the same way.

In battles over land use, conservationists often cite the existence of rare animals and plants, or the potential to find new species. The finding of a new species of insect, however, is unlikely to steer the conversation about wetlands preservation. Eldredge said, "If we discovered an elusive population of giant panda in Baker Wetlands, no one would think twice to conserve the land and the beasts."


Comments

Interesting How Evolution Might Be Affected by Poisons

It would seem to me that if a study was done randomly across the USA, that more 'new species' would turn up. Just in the way that new strains of virus's and bacteria turn up, generation after generation. It makes perfect sense that over the next 50-100 years, new insects will also be appearing due to the evolving to overcome the toxic substances we throw at them. Interesting point, even in human evolution. What will our bodies evolve to in the next hundred years,with the toxic residue we are putting into our bodies through now.

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Sometimes it's the work of other scientists that catches our eye at the Biodiversity Institute. The Science Life is a blog that distills a few of these observations from other science blogs, magazines, newspapers and our colleagues at other institutions. Join us as we highlight research discoveries in not only ecology and evolutionary biology, but also areas as diverse as archaeology, medicine, technology and climate change.

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