July 6, 2010

Small Bits of Evidence Lead to Big Find

Some mysteries can be solved if you just know what you're looking for -- and where to find it.

The July 2 edition of the journal Science features a profile on reseacher Dolores Piperno, who perfected microscopic methods to trace the earliest evidence of corn among early peoples of in southern Mexico. Rather than focusing on the plant evidence of corn cobs, which put the date of the earliest domestication of corn at about 6,200 years ago, Piperno and her team looked for tiny bits of evidence among tools that might have used with corn.

Piperno, a scientist with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History and its Tropical Research Institute, and her team found grinding stones with traces of corn that dated to 8,700 years ago in the Balsas River Valley. This helped end a long debate about whether maize had been domesticated in the highlands or the lowlands, Science reported. Her techniques, while greeted with skepticism at first, were accepted  by others in the field of archaeobiology.

Quoted the publication:

"That's exactly how you're supposed to do science," says archaeobotanist Deborah Pearsall of the University of Missouri, Columbia. "If you look at the corpus of Dolores's work, you see the power of a scientist who chooses her research topics on the basis of hypotheses she wants to test."

Read more about Piperno's work at Science.

 

 


Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Use <bib>citekey</bib> or [bib]citekey[/bib] to insert automatically numbered references.
  • Insert Google Map macro.
  • [[nid:123]] - insert a node content

More information about formatting options

About the Science Life

Sometimes it's the work of other scientists that catches our eye at the Biodiversity Institute. The Science Life is a blog that distills a few of these observations from other science blogs, magazines, newspapers and our colleagues at other institutions. Join us as we highlight research discoveries in not only ecology and evolutionary biology, but also areas as diverse as archaeology, medicine, technology and climate change.

Go to the Science Life home page.

Recent Posts