Matthew Jones

Matthew Jones

Graduate Student
785.864.3216
Dyche Hall

Matt is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology who studies the evolution and paleobiogeography small, insectivorous mammals in the early Cenozoic, with a focus on bat evolution and dispersal.

Research: 

Matt's research interests include bat origins and evolution, paleobiogeography of bats, evolution of early Cenozoic mammals, and evolution of terrestrial behaviors in flying vertebrates.

Publications: 

Jones, M.F., Coster, P.M.C., Licht, A., Métais, G., Ocakoğlu, F., Taylor, M.H., and Beard, K.C, 2018. A stem bat (Chiroptera: Palaeochiropterygidae) from the late middle Eocene of northern Anatolia: implications for the dispersal and palaeobiology of early bats. Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12549-018-0338-z

Jones, M.F., 2017. Greater Yellow-headed Vulture (Cathartes melambrotus), version 1.0. In Neotropical Birds Online (T. S. Schulenberg, editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York, USA. Online: https://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu/Species-Account/nb/species/gyhvul1

Jones, M.F., Dzenowski, N.D., and McLeod, D.S., 2017. A new state size record for the red-spotted toad (Anaxyrus punctatus): Implications for a species in need of conservation in Kansas. Collinsorum, v. 6, p. 11-12.

York, H.A., Foster, P.F., Jones, M.F., Schwartz, W.H., Vezeau, A.L., and Zerwekh, M.S., 2008. Observations of cavity-roosting behavior in Costa Rican Lophostoma brasiliense. Mammalian Biology, v. 73, p. 230-232.

Teaching: 

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Spring 2018, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
The University of Kansas
Courses: Human Anatomy

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Fall 2015–Spring 2018, Peer Led Undergraduate Supplements (PLUS)—Department of Molecular Biosciences
The University of Kansas
Courses: Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Principles of Organismal Biology

Teaching Assistant, Summer 2016, John's Hopkins Center for Talented Youth
John's Hopkins University
Course: Paleobiology

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Summer 20162017, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
The University of Kansas
Course: Field Herpetology

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Fall 2012–Spring 2015, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
The University of Kansas
Courses: Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Principles of Organismal Biology

Teaching Assistant, Spring 2012, Department of Geology
The University of Kansas
Course: Paleontology

Professional Presentations: 

Jones, M.F., Thurber, N.A., and Beard, K.C., 2017. New specimens of Chiromyoides (Mammalia: Plesiadapidae) from the late Paleocene of Wyoming illuminate relationships among North American and European species of the genus. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2017, p. 139. Poster presentation.

Jones, M.F., Beard, K.C., Coster, P., Metais, G., Ocakoglu, F., Licht, A., and Taylor, M., 2016. A primitive fossil bat from the late Middle Eocene of northern Anatolia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2016, p. 163. Poster presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2015. Preliminary analysis of the terrestrial abilities of bats in the families Emballonuridae and Vespertilionidae. Symposium of the North American Society for Bat Research Abstracts, v. 45, p. 46. Poster presentation.

Hasiotis, S.T., Jones, M.F., Falk, A., and Platt, B.F., 2015. Actualistic study of vertebrate ichnology–understanding the behavior that produces trackways, swim trails, and feeding patterns of vertebrates. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 47, p. 68. Oral presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2015. Neoichnology of an ecologically and morphologically diverse family of bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) and implications for identifying bat traces in the fossil record. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2015, p. 152. Poster presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2015. Terrestrial behaviors of the new world leaf-nosed bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) and their track and trackway morphology. Kansas Academy of Science Program and Abstracts, 2015. Poster presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2014. Neoichnology and tracemaking behavior of Desmodus rotundus. Symposium of the North American Society for Bat Research Abstracts, v. 44, p. 43. Oral presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2014. Neoichnology of Costa Rican bats: track morphology and trackmaking ability of phyllostomid and emballonurid bats. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 46, p. 76. Oral presentation.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2014. Paleontological implications of bat trackways and trakmaking ability based on neoichnological observations of the fruit bat Carollia perspicillata. Kansas Academy of Science Program and Abstracts, 2014, p. 45. Oral presentation.

Connolly, A.M., Golab, J.A., Wolfe, B.A., Wildermuth, S., Hammersburg, S.R., Jackson, A.M., Dzenowski, N.D., Falk, A.R., Jones, M.F., and Hasiotis, S.T., 2013. A new ichnology website at the University of Kansas (http://ichnology.ku.edu): A guide to identify trace fossils, interpret organism behaviors, and reconstruct paleoenvironments and paleoecosystems, and understand the stratigraphic record of behavior.  10th North American Paleontological Convention Abstract Book: The Paleontological Society Special Publication, v. 13, p. 95.

Jones, M.F., 2013. Recognizing bat tracks and trackways in the fossil record: proposed morphological criteria based on trackways of the neotropical fruit bat Carollia perspicillata. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2013, p. 150. Poster presentation.

Hasiotis, S.T., Halfen, A.F., Counts, J.W., Wasserman, H., Platt, B.F., Hembree, D.I., Jones, M.F., Hirmas, D.R., and Smith, J.J., 2013. Exploring old and new frontiers in continental ichnology–evaluating its place in ichnology and its role in geology. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 45, No. 7, p. 898.

Jones, M.F. and Hasiotis, S.T., 2012. A preliminary analysis of the trackway-making ability of bats (Phyllostomidae, Carollinae). Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, v. 44, p. 501. Oral presentation.

Professional Societies: 

Society of Vertebrate Paleontology

North American Society for Bat Research

Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science

Geological Society of America

The Paleontological Society