John Kaiser

Friday, June 26, 2015

Careless Travels: The Return to "Home"

Note: this post is one of dozens written by students participating in a 2015 field course in Costa Rica. The entire series is here

As an Army brat, the concept of home is an idea that differs drastically from the views held by many of my classmates. Since the day I was born, my family has moved around to countless different locations, stayed a few months to possibly a few years, then packed up everything and left. As such, a single location that I can call home is completely foreign to me.

Take, for example, this new place that I am living at now. It’s an army base in Wiesbaden, Germany, a place that I have never seen before in my life. My dog is here, all the stuff that I decided not to bring to college is here, and even my family whom I have not seen in over ten months is here. I’ve lived here for less time than I’ve lived in Costa Rica, yet I already consider this place to be my home. When I told this to several of my classmates, they found this to be absolutely implausible. How could a home be a place I’d never seen before? To me, I’ve always found a home to be a place that makes me comfortable, a place that I can come home to after a hard day and just relax.

This brings me to my trip in Costa Rica. 

Every single day I would undergo some new thrill, some new adventure that very few people get the opportunity to enjoy, from playing with local dogs that randomly decided to include us in their pack, to spotting a sloth on a walk down to the beach, all the way to discovering how some of the best coffee in the Western Hemisphere is prepared. Although I was given the opportunity to do this, a new discovery or adventure is nothing without people to uncover it with.

My classmates were without a doubt an important part of this voyage, from their roles in uncovering exciting new sights out in the wild to being roommates for two straight weeks. Although many wanted to get out of Costa Rica by the end of the two weeks, I was ready to stick it through for quite a while more. Costa Rica had become a place of new friends, vast stores of knowledge and countless adventures. Which brings me back to the ultimate point of this blog post; Costa Rica had become, without a doubt, my home for the past two weeks.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Hummingbirds: the vampires of the plant world

Note: this post is one of dozens written by students participating in a 2015 field course in Costa Rica. The entire series is here

A single flower lay out in the Costa Rican jungle, peacefully photosynthesizing and opening its petals in an effort to attract its arthropod pollinator. The woods were quiet except for the occasional rustling from a KU Field Biology class that was inexplicably tearing apart flowers in the nearby vicinity.

Suddenly, a flurry of wings appeared out of nowhere, beating with enough force to convince an uneducated individual that what you were hearing was an angry wasp. If a plant were capable of thought, it would understand that the horrible droning in the air was not coming from a measly wasp but from something much more horrifying. The plant would understand that it had become the victim of the hummingbird, otherwise known as the Vampire of the Plant world! Horrified, the plant could do nothing but remain still as the hummingbird plunged its ferocious bill into the depths of the flower and lap up all of its precious nectar before zooming off into the jungle to find its next victim

For those who don’t know much about hummingbirds, allow me to shed some light on this ferocious species, but be warned; vampires like having light shed on them just about as much as I like vampires. The hummingbird is a common bird species found throughout the New World where it can often be seen out in the wild, sucking the vital nectar from local flowers. The hummingbird’s metabolism is incredibly high and typically requires a single bird to consume up to three times its body weight in nectar on any given day. Smaller hummingbirds will also often substantiate their diets with alternate food sources, terrorizing insects when the larger and more territorial hummingbirds claim nearby flowers as their own. The energy garnered from this is used up almost immediately as it is diverted into the hummingbird’s wings, which can beat up to 100 times a minute according to a Monteverde guide.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Love Knows No Bounds

Note: this post is one of dozens written by students participating in a 2015 field course in Costa Rica. The entire series is here

The natural world is full of many wondrous things. None of these things however is as beautiful as the gift of life. For those not yet bestowed with this wonderful gift, the only way that they can receive it is from certain biological processes that those already bestowed with this gift need to engage in. 

While on our trip, we were given the perfect opportunity to witness this beautiful act among several groups of beetles. During our third day out in the field, we saw an enamored tiger beetle couple engaging in the precursor activity to the miracle of life.

Down on the ground, a strapping young male lay atop the iridescent carapace of a husky larger female, trying with all his might to penetrate using his mighty aedagous deep into the warm depths of the female’s ovipore. 

When we interrupted the beetles, the insects’ bodies squirmed, writhing with the combined energies of their powerful biological urge to grant life while at the same time trying to save their own. Another group member opened the bag, quickly stuffing star-struck lovers into the bag full of unforgiving ethanol. Shocked yet amazed by the beetles, our group crowded around the bag to watch the insects continue their dance of life and death. As the ethanol continued to suck out all their life energy, the beetles finally released each other, trying their best to crawl to the top of the bag in a futile attempt to escape from their cruel prison. Despite all their best efforts, the unforgiving bag provided no escape. The beetles floated to the bottom of their bag, the beautiful gift that they had been trying to grant to other beetles now completely gone from their own bodies. 

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Insect Vaqueros: The Herding Ants

 

When most people think of herding, an image of a cowboy walking a herd of cattle across an open plain often comes to mind. The insect world, however, has a far more intriguing example of herding.

Despite having been in Costa Rica for only a few days, several groups of herding ants have been discovered in the various sites that the group visited. Looking from an outsider’s perspective, there seemed to be nothing more than a small size group of animals nestled together under the branch of a tree. Upon closer inspection however, one can truly appreciate the naturalistic relationship between the herding ants and their “cattle.” While out on the University of Costa Rica campus, the first group of herding ants was uncovered (see photo at left, by Kyle Clark). The animals being herded were the larval( or nymph) form of Florida, burrowers that dig into the branches to suck the nectar out of the tree. Because the branch contains high amounts of water, the bugs that are absorbing nutrients from the branch release a large volume of sugar filled urine. As these larvae suck out and secrete the excess sap for the ants to consume, the ants patrol the branch, protecting their herd from danger. The larvae continue to eat, the low nutrition-to-liquid ratio quickly leads to an excess of sugary liquid that develop around the animal’s rear. The patrolling ants can then “milk” their cattle, consuming the nectar off the larvae’s body.

The following day, the exact same interaction between more herding ants and aphids were observed on the stem of another small plant (see photo by John Kaiser, below). This "ant herding" interaction between the two species is a text book example of mutualism because both the organisms benefit greatly from the others exisistence and production. Relationships like these are truly fascinating to us because it shows how two organisms can co-evolve to survive and be successful! - Kyle Clark and John Kaiser

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Costa Rica 2015 blog: Introducing John

My name is John Kaiser and I will be a junior at KU studying Molecular and Cellular Biology. I have a deep interest in studying organisms on both the ecological and molecular levels. During the Field Biology Program to Costa Rica, I hope to expand my scientific knowledge and research skills by engaging in ecological exploration to better understand the interactions between organisms in the lush ecosystems of Costa Rica. Additionally, I plan on learning more about the Spanish dialect native to Costa Rica in order to better understand the diversification of the Spanish language and culture throughout Central America. -John