Friday, July 11, 2014
Rich Glor

Undergraduate poster

Undergraduate researcher Catherine Chen recently presented the results of her research at the Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Session in the KU Union. Catherine's work investigated stereotypical display behavior in the lizard Anolis distichus.

Friday, July 11, 2014
Rich Glor

Shed

Shed

A friend of KU Herpetology in the Endowment office would like to know if we have any thoughts on the identify of the snake whose shed skin was found by some kids heading into a hole near her garage. The sender notes that while the images are reasonably well-lit and in-focus compared to the photos we usually receive that the basket weave chair may have been included to challenge us. Best guess wins a point in the KU Center for Herpetological Accuracy's Annual herp identification contest.

Thursday, July 10, 2014
Rich Glor

K State Tour

On Thursday, July 10th, KU Herpetology curator Rich Glor hosted a field trip by undergraduate students in the Kansas State Summer REU program under the direction of Drs. Bruce Snyder and Ted Morgan. The long-running K State REU program is analagous to KU's own REU program in ecology and evolutionary biology and has seen completion of a range of interesting undergraduate projects and publications, many relating to biodiversity science.  The members of the K State proved an impressive and engaged group with plenty of good questions. 

Monday, June 9, 2014
Cary Bowen

 
Buenos noches desde Lima, Peru! I have been in Peru a few days, prior to the class arrival. It has already been adventure. My luggage was delayed two nights; I was pickpocketed; I got lost walking through Centro de Lima, and then found, grateful for the friendly Limeños. I have enjoyed seeing the beautiful brown faces and smiles and listening to the sing song pattern of their Spanish.

About five years ago, I was sitting in a long meditation with my Kundalini sangha when an image of myself meditating at Macchu Picchu began to dominate my experience. Since that first occurrence, I have been drawn to Peru. In January, I realized traveling to Peru might be attainable during a phone conversation with Dr. Chaboo. From that moment I began the long process of making vision a reality.

It was an extremely difficult journey to begin, since I was also coping with family illness. I nearly gave up, thinking it may be best for me to remain at home. In the end I boarded the first of three flights to arrive in Lima, alone and without my luggage or my Spanish-English dictionary. Always write down your hotel information and stash an extra pair of clothes and your toothbrush in your carry-on bag. This is what saved my sanity upon a less-than-perfect arrival and allowed me to be safely deposited at our hotel to begin this Peruvian adventure.

-Carey

Thursday, June 5, 2014
Rich Glor

Landestoy

Dominican naturalist, photographer, and professional guide Miguel Landestoy visited KU Herpetology for several days in early June to view specimens and records from the late Albert Schwartz. Miguel is working to track down some of Schwartz's most unusual discoveries and came to KU primarily to familiarize himself with a few species that are particularly well-represented in Schwartz's material, but rare elsewhere. Check out Miguel's photos on Flickr.

Thursday, May 29, 2014
David McLeod

Most of our frogs have come from the permanent pond on the Konza property. We have found four species here: northern cricket frogs, Cope’s gray tree frog, leopard frogs, and bullfrogs. We’ve also found a red-sided garter snake and one particularly unhappy common snapping turtle, shown above.

-Matt Jones, graduate student in geology/vertebrate paleontology.

 

Thursday, May 29, 2014
David McLeod

Chan and studentsWe are about to embark on our second week of fieldwork. Students have had the weekend at home to do laundry and regroup before we head off to Barber County and the Alexander Ranch. I’m told that this will be the first KU party to visit the ranch in 40 years.

Our hope is that with a little rain we might also be among the few to ever hear a chorus of the Red-spotted toad in Kansas. Our second stop will be Baxter Springs in Cherokee County, home to a number of salamanders found nowhere else in the state.

Coachwhip snake

Last week was a great success. I’m so proud of the students! Many are pre-health care students headed for careers as nurses, doctors, and physical therapists. Perhaps unlikely participants in a field biology course, but here they are catching lizards, snakes and frogs. While handing a prairie king snake at the end of last week, one student remarked “If you’d told me a week ago that I’d be wrangling snakes for a photo session, I’d have told you that you were nuts!” Yet, here she was, pillowcase held over the snake on a picturesque rock set against a landscape of sandstone, mixed grasses, and desert plants at Wilson State Lake.

Collared LizardOur most exciting finds last week were the abundance of Collared lizards in central Kansas, the grass-swimming Glass lizard (which has no legs), some “horned toads” (really lizards), and two 5’ long Coachwhip snakes. Who knows what this week will hold. 

-David McLeod, instructorSarah and a snake

Saturday, May 24, 2014
David McLeod

Nicole loves herpetologyI don’t know when the last time was that KU offered a field Herpetology course. Months ago it was decided that this would be a good year to correct for this absence. Our goal: to collect local amphibians and reptiles from different regions of the state to bolster our genetic resources at the BI. 

On May 19th,  12 would-be herpetologists set off on a grand expedition across the state. First stop—Konza Prairie Biological Research Station in the heart of the Flint Hills. This unique tall grass prairie ecosystem reserve boasts a diverse community of amphibians and reptiles, amazing views, and is home to a herd of about 300 bison.

Our first two days at Konza have been outstanding!Bison at Konza Next stop—Wilson State Lake in the Smokey Hills region of Kansas (Russel Co.)

 

 

 

 

Monday, May 12, 2014
Rich Glor

Ventral surface of snake found in basement.

The herpetology division regularly receives requests for help with snake identification. In most cases, this involves a snake that somebody thinks is venomous on or near their home. We recently received a call from someone near Lawrence who believed they had a Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) in their basement. We asked for a photo and description of the snake, but initially received only the blurry ventral photo above. What do you think? Is this a Copperhead?

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Monday, May 12, 2014
Rich Glor

Kinky snake.

The snake photograph above was just taken by a Lawrence resident near the intersection of Kasold and Princeton streets. The snake is clearly a black ratsnake (Pantherophi obsoletu), but why is it so kinky? Did it just swallow a string of ping pong balls? Snake expert and former KU Herpetology trainee Harry Greene offered one possible explanation: "My hunch is that it's root mimicry, a last ditch effort at crypsis--but then I've been accused of seeing mimicry everywhere!"

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