Entomology

Monday, December 21, 2015

Introducing Luke Schletzbaum

I am Luke Schletzbaum from Overland Park, Kansas and I’m a Junior majoring in Organismal Biology. Some of the things that inspired me to enter my field are habitat loss, species conservation, and science education. I chose to go on this field biology trip with Dr. Chaboo mostly due to the location and the ability to conduct fieldwork in a location renowned for its incredible biodiversity. Over the course of the trip I hope to gain experiences locating and obtaining specimens and how to categorize and prepare them for study. 
When I entered KU I heard many things about how great the study abroad program is.I waited until an opportunity intrigued me, and this was the one!

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Introducing Hebron Kelecha

My name is Hebron Kelecha and I am a senior studying Biochemistry and minoring in Economics. I am originally from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and raised primarily in Gardner, Kansas. This trip really interested me because it was different than any other research I have conducted. Having primarily done cancer biology and other biomedical research, I wanted to get the chance to try something different, and have heard nothing but great feedback from students who went. This trip also gave me the chance to finally study abroad before I graduate. I hope this trip continues to affirm my love for research while also challenging me. I can't wait to explore the culture and all that Costa Rica has to offer.

Sunday, December 20, 2015

Introducing Delaney Bates

Hello! I am Delaney Bates, and I am an Ecology and Evolutionary Biology major (junior) at the University of Kansas. I plan to pursue a career in medicine. Traveling the world has always been a dream of mine, and being in Costa Rica is surreal. I first studied abroad in France and Spain when I was 15 years old; I have been craving to travel abroad again. This Costa Rica program allows me to explore biological research, expand my knowledge of organisms in their natural environment, and develop field research skills while immersing myself in an unfamiliar culture and country. Studying abroad at the University of Kansas has been an ambition of mine, and I’m ecstatic to fulfill this goal in Costa Rica. 

Friday, June 12, 2015

Bad Banana: Beautiful plant going bad?

The banana family, scientifically called Musaceae, comprises two genera and about 80 species from Africa and Asia.  Edible bananas and plantains both belong to the genus Musa.  The bananas we eat do not grow on a banana "tree".  Rather, the plant is an herb, with an underground rhizome, a "stem" made of tightly-packed stems of the large showy leaves, and the inflorescence where each flower produces one edible banana.  Bananas are thought to have been domesticated about 8000 BC in southeast Asia; those soft tiny black specks at the center of the banana fruit are sterile - they cannot be planted for new plants.  The plant forms suckers (root sprouts) that help create a clump of banana plants or that are separable for new plants.  While bananas are eaten raw, plantains must be cooked.  Both are delicious and of immense value in the tropical larder.  Scientists believe that these edible bananas are actually hybrids from two wild species, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana.  Costa Rica is a major exporter of bananas; forests have been cut to grow large monocultures and high pesticide use is implicated as a threat to caiman populations.

Banana plants are beautiful!  It is not surprising that we see ornamental bananas commonly planted along roads and in gardens -  those big showy leaves and big colorful infloresences bring that lush "tropical" touch.  One spectacular introduced ornamental banana is Musa velutina.  I noted this beauty commonly grown on our route and I am wondering if native arthropods on native Zingiberales can expand their host range to this exotic.  I also wonder if the viable seeds of M. velutina can grow - perhaps spread in bird droppings.  It is not uncommon for beautiful garden plants to break free, run rampant, and become scourges, no matter how "pretty" they appear.

Musa velutina, an introduced ornamental banana growing in Costa Rica
Musa velutina seeds are viable, unlike the bananas we eat
Bird food!