Microbes At Home

image of three microbe fungal plates with increasing growth

Above images: Growth of fungi swabbed from a television remote, photographed on Day 3, 5, and 6.

If you’ve visited the KU Natural History Museum, you’ve likely seen living fungi in our Microbes in the Museum exhibit, or perhaps swabbed an item yourself at one of our Microbes on the Move traveling outreach program, funded by Kansas NSF EPSCoR, which brings science to families across the state.

A FEW FUNGAL FACTS
• Fungi have to eat just like you and I. The plates contain the fungi food and an antibiotic called ampicillin to keep bacteria from growing on the plates.
• Fungi are more closely related to animals than plants.
• Fungi have to eat just like you and I. The plates contain the fungi food and an antibiotic called ampicillin to keep bacteria from growing on the plates.

• Fungi are more closely related to animals than plants.
Want more fungal facts? Download our Fungi Facts PDF. 

As you explore the fungal plates, look at the changes in height, edges, and different shapes that you see. Here's more information and some scientific names for what you'll see:
graphic of different microbes edges

graphic of different microbes shapes