Unpacking Antarctica

Monday, April 13, 2015
Jennifer Humphrey

Nearly four months after the KU Antarctica team returned to campus, the 5,000 pounds of fossil material they collected in Antarctica will arrive at KU on Monday, April 13. 

Staff and students will start unloading 50-60 wooden crates of  material that is 260 to 180 million years old, from the Permian and Jurassic periods.  

Although most people think of Antarctica as a barren, cold environment, 200 million years ago it was a land of lush forest – a forest that now permineralized can yield clues to the climate change of the past, and how plants today may react to climate change as well.

The fossil material will help scientists study floral changes during the Jurassic in the Transantarctic Mountains of Antarctica. 

“This research is important in understanding what climate and environment was like at the poles during one of Earth’s past greenhouse climates and how plants responded to both climate changes and instantaneous disruptions through the rise of volcanoes,” said Rudy Serbet, collection manager of paleobotany at KU Biodiversity Institute and a team leader for the trip. “These sorts of times and environmental stresses are key to understanding how current climate change may effect high latitude plants.”

During the seven weeks they were in Antarctica, the group took several camping field trips “out to the ice,” including the  Odell Glacier area and the Allan Hills. 

No staff or students have seen the material in the intervening months as it made its way from Antarctica to California to Kansas. 

"Today is like Christmas in April,” said Paleobotany Curator Edith Taylor, lead PI on the National Science Foundation grant that funded the research.

Archived posts from the group are available here