Saturday, July 9, 2016

Arabian horse

Sandi Olsen, curator-in-charge of archaeology, was recently interviewed for The National in an article by Daniel Bardsley titled “Scientists try to uncover mystery of Arabian horse’s ancestry.” Olsen uses rock carvings (petroglyphs) to understand the origins of the Arabian horse. As the article notes, “Petroglyphs from Saudi Arabia that show equines with Arabian features date between 800 BCE and 200 CE, based on associated inscriptions.” Based on the work she’s been doing, Olsen believes that it is too soon to be making any conclusions about the Arabian site of Al Magar as many believe this to be the place where horse domestication began. According to Olsen, there are a few other possible origin sites of horse domestication, including Kazakshtan, Ukraine, or western Russia. To read more, click here. 

Photo by Esam Omran Al-Fetori / Reuters

Archaeology
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Ph.D. student, Marianna Simoes, co-mentored by Andrew Short and Town Peterson, has received the 2016 Coleopterists Society Graduate Student Research Enhancement Award to support the development of a molecular phylogeny of the Dorynotini leaf Beatles. 

Entomology
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Ph.D. student, Marianna Simoes, co-mentored by Andrew Short and Town Peterson, has received the 2016 Coleopterists Society Graduate Student Research Enhancement Award to support the development of a molecular phylogeny of the Dorynotini leaf Beatles. 

Entomology
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Ph.D. student, Marianna Simoes, co-mentored by Andrew Short and Town Peterson, has received the 2016 Coleopterists Society Graduate Student Research Enhancement Award to support the development of a molecular phylogeny of the Dorynotini leaf Beatles. 

Entomology
Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Andrew Short, assistant curator, recently received a $6600 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) supplement to his NSF Career award to support undergraduate student, Alex Kohlenberg, over the summer. Kohlenberg will be revising a genus of water scavenger beetles.

Entomology
Monday, April 4, 2016

Edith Taylor, senior curator, Tom Taylor, and Collection Manager, Rudy Serbet, have learned that their research proposal "CSBR: Natural History: Securing Paleobotanical Collections at the University of Kansas: Evolution of Seed Plants and Antarctic Fossil Plants,” has been awarded $495,455 by the National Science Foundation. This will allow for new compactor shelving for the Paleobotany collection. 

Paleobotany
Monday, April 4, 2016

Edith Taylor, senior curator, Tom Taylor, and Collection Manager, Rudy Serbet, have learned that their research proposal "CSBR: Natural History: Securing Paleobotanical Collections at the University of Kansas: Evolution of Seed Plants and Antarctic Fossil Plants,” has been awarded $495,455 by the National Science Foundation. This will allow for new compactor shelving for the Paleobotany collection. 

Paleobotany
Monday, April 4, 2016

Edith Taylor, senior curator, Tom Taylor, and Collection Manager, Rudy Serbet, have learned that their research proposal "CSBR: Natural History: Securing Paleobotanical Collections at the University of Kansas: Evolution of Seed Plants and Antarctic Fossil Plants,” has been awarded $495,455 by the National Science Foundation. This will allow for new compactor shelving for the Paleobotany collection. 

Paleobotany
Tuesday, May 23, 2017

triassic fish

Graduate student, Sarah Gibson, has recently been published in PLoS with her article titled "Redescription and Phylogenetic Placement of †Hemicalypterus weir Schaeffer, 1967 (Actinopterygii, Neopterygii) from the Triassic Chinle Formation, Southwestern United States: New Insights into Morphology, Ecological Niche, and Phylogeny." In the article, Sarah reveals some of the latest insights she's discovered into the life and evolution of the Hemicalypterus, including that it evolved herbivory tens of millions of years before other fish did. To read the full article, click here. To gain even further insight, including why fish workers add a cross symbol to the beginning of extinct species names, an interview with Sarah about her PLoS article can be found here

 

Ichthyology
Thursday, July 14, 2016

Chris Beard’s article, “Out of Asia: Anthropoid Origins and the Colonization of Africa,” was recently published in the Annual Review of Anthropology. Previous research has attempted to explain the dispersed geographic distribution of anthropoid primates by hypothesizing tectonic rifts between South America and Africa as the cause, but Beard points out that those predictions conflict with the chronology and the topology of anthropoid evolution. In this article, Beard identifies and discusses biological and geological factors that support the assertion that the cause of dispersal was the crossing of marine barriers by early monkeys on natural rafts. To read the full article, please click here.

Vertebrate Paleontology